Wednesday, 14 December 2016

In Search of the Psychometric Giants of Atlantis - John Foster Forbes: A Life Among Megaliths



At the heart of John Foster Forbes' philosophy and work lies his admirable contention that the subjects of Archeology and Anthropology should not be held exclusively within the interest of a limited group of academics and experts, and that such topics belong to everyone to explore and examine for themselves. His belief was that these twin fields of science were far too important towards discovering the origins of humanity, so as to remain within the exclusive possession of an elite circle who alone control their narratives.


Introduction
I first came across the name John Foster Forbes in 2015 while I was working on the final drafts of what was to become my own book entitled The Druid Code: Magic, Megaliths and Mythology, when a friend of mine handed me a rather appealing, but well worn and badly repaired copy of the book entitled Ages Not So Dark. I found the title instantly captivating with its almost childish, but deliciously appealing cover art. The image was of seven druid-like individuals – apparently of both sexes – with their arms held aloft, and each of their hands joined joined into a triangular shape formed above their heads. In front of these seven ancient sages, were five megalithic standing stones with the rising (or setting) sun situated between them, being the subject of the druid's and druidess' veneration as an art deco type representations of the sun's rays decorated the top half of the cover. The quality of the printing being very much a product of British austerity, but nonetheless, the image was captivating and well presented given the obvious financial and technical limitations imposed upon the printing press which produced it.

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